Can dyslexia be cured?

Can Dyslexia be cured?

Children with dyslexia benefit greatly from effective intervention. It isn't, however, a "cure." Dyslexia is a lifelong disorder that affects more than just basic reading abilities.

Dyslexia is, at its core, a language-related brain problem. Children with dyslexia have a hard time processing linguistic sounds. Words are tough for them to decode. They frequently have difficulties with spelling. They may also have difficulties with writing. Reading difficulties might also be caused by problems with working memory.

As a result, reading problems may persist long after children have learned to read. Reading is more mechanical and less automatic for many children with dyslexia. It's also a little slower.

Children with dyslexia benefit from reading programs like Orton–Gillingham, which adopt a systematic and clear multisensory approach. This form of education teaches children how to recognize words. However, employing those tactics requires more work than simply being able to recognize words. Additionally, children with dyslexia produce more reading errors than regular children. As a result, individuals spend more time reviewing the content they've just viewed to ensure that they've read it correctly.

Visual skills in Dyslexia:

It's worth noting that the word "dyslexia" is enclosed in quotation marks. That's because you may have struggled simply because your visual abilities took longer to develop than those of your contemporaries. Your binocular vision skills suddenly clicked in one day in late first grade, and what the instructor was saying to you about reading began to make sense. This is pretty typical, prompting many first-grade teachers to reassure parents of struggling readers that their child appears brilliant and is most likely one of the "late bloomers" she encounters each year. This, however, is not dyslexia; rather, it is a case of slower-than-average visual development. It's doubtful that you've ever thought about having a reading problem.

Adaptation by Brain:

It's worth noting that the word "dyslexia" is enclosed in quotation marks. That's because you may have struggled simply because your visual abilities took longer to develop than those of your contemporaries. Your binocular vision skills suddenly clicked in one day in late first grade, and what the instructor was saying you about reading began to make sense. This is pretty typical, prompting many first-grade teachers to reassure parents of struggling readers that their child appears brilliant and is most likely one of the "late bloomers" she encounters each year. This, however, is not dyslexia; rather, it is a case of slower-than-average visual development. It's doubtful that you've ever thought about having a reading problem.

Dietary Cure of Dyslexia:

There are several foods that aid in the treatment of dyslexia, such as fish oil, which, probably due to the Omega 3 fatty acids in the oil, has a good influence on reading skills. The effect occurs quickly, implying that it was influencing something physical rather than simply improving a child's learning abilities over time. In a trial employing multivitamins, a similar result was obtained. This supports the idea that dyslexia includes particular brain processing abilities, presumably including visual processing, and that supplementation allowed that processing to continue more normally. Because all of these disorders are characterized by delays or disruptions in normal child development processes and share many common symptoms, vitamin D3 deficiency is also causing an increase in the incidence of dyslexia and ADHD symptoms.

Vision therapy for Dyslexia:

Every youngster who is having trouble reading should be evaluated by a developmental optometrist to rule out visual skills issues.

Many children go through vision therapy and then readily pick up my phonics lesson afterward, so I'm not sure if it cures dyslexia. I would say no in this scenario, especially given they frequently displayed additional signs of developmental delay, such as weakened immune systems or inadequate gross and fine motor abilities. In this situation, vision treatment addressed the specific developmental delay that was making reading so difficult, namely, their poor visual skills, while phonics education filled in the gaps concerning how print works.

 

Read or listen to more articles:

Do I have dyslexia?

Earlier diagnosis of Dyslexia:

What does dyslexia mean?

How do people get dyslexia?

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